Larimar

September 16, 2018





It's not easy to find a top-down, seamless, V-neck sweater pattern, so last year when I saw Larimer from Isabell Kraemer I promptly bought it. I knew Isabell would do a great job with such a pattern and I wasn't disappointed. The construction is ingenious and is exactly what I love to knit. Isabell describes the construction better than I can: "Pullover is worked seamlessly from the top down, beginning with back shoulders and back yoke. Stitches are picked up at shoulders and worked for each front, then joined to work body in the round with short row shaping at lower edge. Stitches for sleeves are picked up around armhole edge, and caps are shaped with short rows. Extra-long sleeves are worked in the round to the cuffs. Stitches are picked up around neck edge and worked in a simple trim." I really encourage you to try this pattern if you've been thinking about knitting a garment using non-traditional techniques. Isabell does a good job with pattern writing and an enthusiastic beginner should not have too much trouble. Isabell also has an avid fan group on Ravelry that loves to help and Isabell herself is very approachable. These newish techniques have become the norm now in pattern writing and garment knitting, and it's no surprise knitters are choosing these one-piece variations over the traditional seamed garments. Most knitters find these techniques easier and most important, easier to get the fit you want with no surprises in the end. I still knit some seamed garments as seams are important in some garment construction, but not all. Seams do aid in stability that some garments need, but if it's not needed, I look for another pattern.

I made my Larimar with a good amount of ease using Rowan's Super Fine Merino 4Ply. This yarn is simply perfect: 100% super fine merino (that feels like cashmere) in a fingering weight that is machine washable and is soft enough for the most sensitive skin. I have happily used this yarn several times for my grandson and care for it this way: Turn inside out and place in a mesh bag. Machine wash in cool water on the gentle cycle. I admit I even put his little sweaters in the dryer even though the ball band says to dry flat; here's what I do: Still in the mesh bag, tumble dry on low until almost dry. While still slightly damp, carefully turn garment right-side out and pat to shape. Dry flat out of direct sun. Rowan describes this as a fingering weight to be knitted at 28 stitches per 4 inches, but this works best for me as a sport weight with 24 stitches per 4 inches. I adore it.


Larimar has a shaped hem worked with short rows in case you are wondering why it's longer in the back!

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8 comments

  1. Beautiful color, and v-necks work well for me so I will probably be buying this pattern, Thanks so much for the heads up, Kristin. Jared Flood passed around his seamless Cobblestone in a class I took once and it was proof that seams were not always necessary. That sweater wasn't sliding around anywhere. Beautiful, too. Glad to hear Larimar is the same. Chloe

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    1. Thank you Chloe. I've always admired the Cobblestone for men or women, but haven't made one yet. When I saw that sweater I realized that I loved simple shapes, simple styles, and just plain, simple sweaters. It is a gorgeous sweater in tweed!

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  2. What a great fit and style. You are so amazing to knit and share this way. And we all know it’s not the ONLY thing you do well. Your design eye serves you (and us) well. Gorgeous!

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    1. Thank you Dasha! Knitting is the favorite thing I do!

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  3. That’s a beautiful sweater and it looks lovely on you. One thing I don’t like about v neck sweaters is that the stitches at the v are inevitably loose and I see you have had this issue as well. I’ve seen it on many samples for many patterns. You’re obviously a talented and experienced knitter so what hope do the rest of us have?

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    1. Thank you Annie, and you bring up a good point. The loose stitches around the v of a neck just happen, don’t they? I never really think of it as a problem but I’m going to see what I can do with my next V neck. (Can you believe I’m making another grey V neck sweater? This one is in tweed and more fitted so at least it’s a little different.) I will take care and see if I can make them more tight.

      Kristen

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  4. I have recently come to love simpler designs also and look for yarns like tweed (my favorite) to give them Character. Just googled "knitting v-necks" and came up with a whole page-ful of remedies by Techknitter.blogspot.com. Although you, as an experienced knitter, Kristin, could probably devise some others yourself. Me, I need all the help I can get :). Chloe

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    1. Wow! I love this gal and forget to check her out when I have an issue. She has an answer for everything. I printed out her 3 page Vneck notes and will keep it handy. I don’t usually find that loose stitch a problem, but I know it’s there—well, not anymore!

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