the beauty of stacked stitches

Buckle your seat belt, you're in for a wild ride! Have you heard of stacked stitches? These melted crayon color explosions look complicated don't they? They are NOT. This technique uses slipped stitches and some hefty decreases, a bit of counting on some of the rows--so really nothing we don't already know. I have looked at these patterns over the last few years and while I liked them very much, I dismissed them as being way too difficult. Recently a reader brought them to my attention referring to the technique as stacked stitches, which I had not heard of. With a little searching, I found that two designers, Xandy Peters and Natalia Moreva, practically dominate this little corner of the knitiverse. Their designs are nothing less than gorgeous. Xandy Peters has two free patterns, an oak leaf and a star so you can have a wee try for yourself. Give either one a try--I think you'll love it as much as I did! The name and designer with Ravelry links are in each caption. Prepare to fall in love.

Fox Paws by Xandy Peters

Fox Paws by Xandy Peters

Sun Salutation by Xandy Peters

Sun Salutation by Xandy Peters

Twinkle by Natalia Moreva


Fascination Wrap and Cowl by Xandy Peters

Lotus Challenge by Xandy Peters

Fox Paws by Xandy Peters

Lothlorien by Natalia Moreva 

Melted Paint by Natalia Moreva

Fascination Wrap and Cowl by Xandy Peters



Fox Paws by Xandy Peters
Fox Paws by Xandy Peters

Frangipani Kiera Foley

Fox Paws by Xandy Peters

Fox Paws by Xandy Peters

Oak Leaf by Xandy Peters is a free download. Give it a try to see if you like stacked stitches.

Maple Leaves by Natalia Moreva shows the back in the foreground.

Flower Meadow by Natalia Morev

 Oak Valley by Natalia Moreva

Poison Oak by Natalia Moreva

Stars by Xandy Peters is also a free pattern to test for yourself.

Ziggy Star Hat by Xandy Peters


OK, so my oak leaf looks more like a little gecko, but he's cute, right?
This was easy peasy to make and I think a large shawl would be a fascinating knit.



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Winter Blooms






Sometimes I think I'd love to wake up to see my garden dusted with snow. I love that idea, but I know it will never happen. So I think again and realize I'd be terrible driving in it and would hate shoveling it, and I also wouldn't have my pretty January blooms and February orange juice and all the green that covers our hills every winter and spring.

Paperwhites.

Helleborus viridis.

Camellia

When the camellias fall off the plant, they can be rescued and placed on a surface and will last for a few days,
no water needed.







The moss is pretty but will have to be hand scraped from every brick. By me. This winter.
And there seems to be miles of it.




This tiger striped plant above and the plainer ones below, pop up in my shady garden spots every January and stay through summer. They make perfect arrangement fillers and are gorgeous on their own. I think they are a type of landscape philodendron, but I'm not certain. Does anyone know?



Neglected. More work!




Flowering quince.


Flowering quince.


Narcissis.

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